Europe’s Largest 3D Printed Building Takes Shape in Germany

After the first printed house in Germany, Mense-Korte now also dedicate themselves to the largest printed building in Europe. Copyright: Mense-Korte ingenieure + architekten
After the first printed house in Germany, Mense-Korte now also dedicate themselves to the largest printed building in Europe. Copyright: Mense-Korte ingenieure + architekten

Construction is underway on what will be Europe’s largest 3D printed building, as two German architectural firms push the boundaries of additive manufacturing technology in the building sector.

The pioneering project involves printing a sprawling server farm for Heidelberg iT, measuring 54 meters long, 11 meters wide, and 9 meters tall. Led by architects Mense-Korte and SSV Architekten, the ambitious undertaking utilizes a specialized 3D concrete printing system to construct the shell of the building, which will house robust server infrastructure.

“For us as pioneers in 3D printing, using Allplan is a key advantage. It not only supports us in realizing unique and innovative building projects like this one, but also allows us to further maximize the potential of this new construction method,” said Waldemar Korte, architect and partner at Mense-Korte.

With printing commencing on March 31st, the building’s shell is on track for completion by end of July. The pure printing time is estimated at just 170 hours, with only two construction workers needed on-site during the process, according to the client KRAUSGRUPPE.

Architects Korte and Jan van der Velden-Volkmann of SSV Architekten note that while requiring greater coordination, 3D printing enables more design freedom and cost-effective production of free-form shapes compared to traditional construction methods.

MENSE-KORTE relied on its trusted BIM software Allplan to digitally model and plan the complex printed structure down to precise specifications. The firm has utilized Allplan since its inception and was also involved in Germany’s first 3D printed home in Beckum in 2019, recognized as a landmark for additive construction.

With sustainable building a growing priority, producers like Heidelberg Materials have continued honing 3D printable concrete mixes. The company states its materials used for Germany’s first printed home were already 100% recyclable.

As architects and construction companies continue exploring the technology’s potential, large-scale successes like the Heidelberg iT server farm could pave the way for greater adoption of 3D printing in industrial and commercial building projects.

Explore more topics
Author
Prolific News
Related news stories
Advertisement